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By J. Dain Dulaney, Jr. | “But I don’t want to incorporate in Delaware!” is a common reaction that founders have when a new investor – often a venture capital fund or some other institutional investment group – makes an offer to provide financing to...

By J. Dain Dulaney, Jr. | Business owners ask me the same question almost daily, “How can I provide ownership in my company to employees, contractors and consultants to provide additional incentives for them to work harder for the company?”...

By J. Dain Dulaney, Jr. | Imagine this day for a moment: you are the CEO and announce to your investors and employees that the company is issuing additional equity ownership and that their equity ownership percentage is being diluted. Chaos ensues. You have panicked...

By J. Dain Dulaney, Jr. | So, you’re a start-up using convertible notes to raise money from investors and want to do all you can to attract investors. You know that the investors primarily focus on the discount percentage to the next round of equity...

By Kenneth J. Abner | I am often asked to help conceptualize deal structures for real estate projects that bring together the expertise of a developer with the capital of investors. Over the last 22 years, I have seen it from all sides – not...

By David M. Bishop | If you co-own a business you’ve probably been told to get a buy-sell agreement. A good buy-sell agreement creates a market for your shares when you die or depart the business. A buy-sell agreement also helps you block your co-owner’s...

By Matthew R. Joyner | On January 1, 2014, North Carolina’s “new” limited liability company act went into effect, replacing NCGS §57C with NCGS §57D. Despite the fact that the new LLC Act has been in force for almost two years now, we do not...

By J. Dain Dulaney, Jr. | So you’re the founder of an early stage company and have decided that you want to go out and raise capital for your new business venture. You network and talk to a number of people who give you great...

By David M. Bishop | Everyone knows that a letter of intent is not binding, right? Isn’t that why they call it a letter of intent rather than a contract? Well, not so fast. The question is more complex than it seems....